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ISBN 10:

0-87844-150-6,

ISBN 13:

978-0-87844-150-1,

 

Softcover $19.95

 

 

 VOICES OF CAROLINA SLAVE CHILDREN

by Nancy Rhyne

 

The slave narratives compiled from interviews in the Works Projects Administration (WPA) files recorded eyewitness accounts of 19th century American slavery.

 Elderly ex-slaves recounted memories of their childhood during their enslaved period to convey a powerful image of their lives and daily activities. They describe work, games, food, clothing, thoughts about their situation and the Civil War, and what freedom gave to each one of them. These stories present brief glimpses into the lives and customs of enslaved children on North and South Carolina plantations. The stories are intimate, personal and go to the heart of the conflict and emotion that burned every moment of that day and time.

 

 

Owls Hollered Right Regular

I heard owls holler right regular on the plantation. I heard them holler plenty times out there somewhere in the trees. Some of the people who heard them holler stuck a fire iron in the fire and that made the owl quit off. I heard talk about a lot of people who did that.

Then there was another sign the people did on New Years Day. I donít understand much about it, but I did hear people speak about craving a cup of peas and a hunk of hog jowl on the first day of the year. They put their faith in that kind of victuals on New Years Day, and they didnít suffer for anything until that time the next year. I ate my cup of peas and hunk of hog jowl every New Years Day just because I loved it, and I reckon I never gave a thought to that sign.

Jessie Sparrow

Gallivants Ferry

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
     
   

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